The Dylan Thomas Prize is a new biennial literary prize, named after the Welsh poet Dylan Thomas, "awarded to the best published writer in English under the age of 30 from anywhere in the world".

The prize is unique in its broad range of eligible material, covering novels, short story collections, poetry collections and plays.

The winner of the prize receives £60,000. The prize was announced in 2004 and the inaugural prize was awarded in October 2006 to Rachel Trezise.

17th September- 2008 Short List - Winner November

Nam Le Wins 2008 £60,000 Dylan Thomas Prize.

blackwell_bookshopA 29-year-old writer originally from Vietnam is the second winner of one of the world's biggest literary awards, the £60,000 Dylan Thomas Prize.

Nam Le, who grew up in Australia, beat five rivals with his debut collection of short stories The Boat.

The prize was presented at the Brangwyn Hall, Swansea on Monday night, and he follows the first winner, Welsh writer Rachel Tresize, from Rhondda.

Le is now based in New York, where he is Harvard Review fiction editor.

The global award, sponsored by the University of Wales, is open to any work, from any genre, which has been published in English and written by someone under 30.

Award Tragic Blog "Rare Treat as Boat Comes in

nam_le2008 Winner Dylan Thomas Prize Nam Le
THE BOAT

ISBN 978-1-84767-160-8

Nam Le was born in Vietnam and raised in Australia. He has previously received the Pushcart Prize, the Michener-Copernicus Society of America Award, and fellowships from the Iowa Writers' Workshop, the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown, and Phillips Exeter Academy. His fiction has appeared in venues including Zoetrope: All-Story, A Public Space, Conjunctions, One Story, NPR's, Selected Shorts and the Best American Nonrequired Reading, Best New American Voices, Best Australian Stories, and Pushcart Prize anthologies. He is the fiction editor of the Harvard Review.

The Boat is a stunningly inventive, deeply moving fiction debut: stories that take the readers from the slums of Colombia to the streets of Tehran; from New York City to Iowa City; from a tiny fishing village in Australia to a foundering vessel in the South China Sea, in a masterful display of literary virtuosity and feeling. In the opening story, "Love and Honor and Pity and Pride and Compassion and Sacrifice," a young writer is urged by his friends to mine his father's experiences in Vietnam — and what seems at first a satire on turning one's life into literary commerce becomes a transcendent exploration of homeland, and the ties between father and son.

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Shortlist Comment Book Award Tragic Blogspot

 

Other 2008 Dylan Thomas Shortlisted Books

   

Caroline Bird
TROUBLE CAME TO THE TURNIP

bird_carolineCaroline Bird was born in 1986. She grew up in Leeds and attended the Steiner School in York before moving to London in 2001. She won the Poetry Society's Simon Elvin Young Poet of the Year Award two years running (1999 and 2000) and won an Eric Gregory Award in 2002. Her poems have appeared in PN Review, Poetry Review, The North magazine and in Carcanet's New Poetries III anthology (2002). Her first collection, Looking Through Letterboxes, built on the traditions of fairy tale, fantasy and romance, was published in 2002. Her second collection, Trouble Came to the Turnip, was published in September 2006. She is currently studying English at Oxford University.

In Trouble Came to the Turnip, Bird’s poems are ferociously vital, fantastical, sometimes violent, almost always savagely humorous and self-mocking. Her world is inhabited by failed and (less often) successful relationships, by the dizzying crisis of early adulthood, by leprechauns and spells and Miss Pringle's seven lovely daughters waiting to spring out of a cardboard cake. And the turnip.

ISBN 1-85754-887-6

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Ceridwen Dovey
BLOOD KINdovey_ceridwen

Ceridwen was born in Pietermaritzburg, South Africa, in 1980. Ceridwen grew up mostly in the small town of East London in the Eastern Cape of South Africa, but she and sister Liniwe went to high school in Sydney. After a year in London working and travelling, she did her undergraduate study at Harvard on scholarship, focusing on Social Anthropology and Visual & Environmental Studies (Film). Ceridwen moved to Cape Town for two years, where she wrote Blood Kin as her thesis for the Masters in Creative Writing at the University of Cape Town, with poet Stephen Watson as her supervisor. She now lives in New York City.

Blood Kin is a story of a president overthrown by a military coup in a nameless country, and in the midst of mass arrests, three members of the Presidential household – his barber, chef and portraitist – are taken hostage in a remote mountain palace. As the order falls, the truth about these men and significant lives is revealed, and the web of complicity and duplicity begins to unravel. Dovey’s mesmerizing debut grapples with humanity’s most mercenary and animalistic instincts, and reminds the reader that the mad king is within us all.

ISBN 978-1-84354-657-3

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Edward Hogan
BLACKMOOR

hogan_edwardEdward Hogan was born in Derby, in 1980. He was working in Nottingham's Council House when he was writing his first novel. After leaving school Edward enrolled on the University of East Anglia's MA in Creative Writing course, winning the David Higham Award. After graduating he was signed up with publisher Simon & Schuster. Since the launch of Blackmoor Edward's been named as 'a writer to watch' by Peter Carty in The Independent whilst authors Miriam Toews and Hilary Mantel are also fans.

The book Blackmoor centres around a small mining community and Edward says he chose this setting because he wanted to find out more about the place he grew up. It's a regional book, about the midlands and the north and what has happened to the mining communities since people have stopped mining. His split time-frame is combined with multiple narrative perspectives, which enable him to dig deep into his characters. He is aided by writing that is charged with a bite and passion harking back to his Northern forebears; D.H. Lawrence, most obviously, with a passing touch of Charlotte Brontë.

ISBN 978-1-84737-098-3

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Dinaw Mengestu
CHILDREN OF THE REVOLUTION

Dinaw Mengestu was born in Ethiopia in 1978 and is a graduate of Georgetwon and Columbia mengestu_dinawUniversities. He works as a journalist and reviewer and is researching a book tracing his extended family’s exile from Ethiopia following the 1974 revolution. Children of the Revolution won the Guardian First Book Award in 2007.

Children of the revolution is a book about one man’s longing for the American dream, and of the tenacious grip of the past across continents and time. It is a tale of an Ethiopian immigrant’s search for acceptance, peace and identity. With effortless prose, Mengestu makes the reader feel this tortured soul’s longings, regrets, and in the end, his dreams of meaningful human connection.

ISBN 978-0-22407-931-0

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Ross Raisin
GOD’S OWN COUNTRY

raisin-rossRoss Raisin was born in Yorkshire and now lives in London. He is twenty-seven years old. Before university he spent time working in the hotel trade, working in hotels in France and Ireland. When he graduated, he began working in a wine bar in London, eventually becoming co-manager. Ross has continued to work as a waiter while writing the novel, and still does so now as he begins his second, a novel about a Glaswegian ex-shipyard worker, whose life unravels after the death of his wife.

God’s Own Country is told through the eyes of the narrator, Sam Marsdyke - the teenage son of a farmer up on the Yorkshire Moors, who spends his days working the sheep, mending fences and trying to dodge the eye of his brutal, silent father, around him. One day a young daughter of a new family catches his eye. As he falls for the young, sophisticated girl from London, she begins to see him as a means to escape but this journey across the moors takes a terrifying menacing turn which, for Sam, will prove his terrible undoing.

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2008 Longlist

Ishq & Mushq by Priya Basil
The Orientalist and the Ghost by Susan Barker
Trouble Came to the Turnip by Caroline Bird
The Secret by Zoe Brigley
Zoology by Ben Dolnick
Blood Kin by Ceridwen Dovey
Submarine by Joe Dunthorne
Oystercatchers by Susan Fletcher
Satsuma Sun Mover by Adam Green
Blackmoor by Edward Hogan
Sons and Other Flammable Objects by Porohistra Khakpour
The Boat by Nam Le
Children of the Revolution by Dinaw Mengestu
There is an Anger that Moves by Kei Miller
God's Own Country by Ross Raisin
St Lucy's Home for Girls Raised by Wolves by Karen Russell

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2006 Winner

Rachel Trezise - Fresh Apples

2006 Shortlist

Lucy Caldwell - Where They Were Missed
Ian Holding - Unfeeling
Nick Laird - Utterly Monkey and To a Fault (Two entries)
James Scudamore - The Amnesia Clinic
Liza Ward - Outside Valentine

2006 Longlist

Susan Barker - Sayonara Bar
Kira Cochrane - Escape Routes for Beginners
Rodge Glass - No Fireworks
Joey Goebel - Torture the Artist
Emily Maguire - Taming the Beast
Matthew David Scott - Playing Mercy
Talitha Stevenson - Exposure

2008 Longlist Book and author details

ISHQ & MUSHQ - Priya Basil

Priya was born in London in 1977, but has spent most of her life away from the metropolis. She grew up in Kenya returning to the UK to study English Literature at the University of Bristol. She had a brief career in advertising before becoming a fulltime writer. She currently divides her time between London and Berlin.

Ishq & Mushq is a sensuous generational novel about a Sikh mother whose secret past corrodes her life with tragic consequences for all - a humorous meditation on memory, exile and self-reinvention, by a 29-yr old. Set on an epic backdrop from Partition, the Coronation and Churchill's funeral, to the present day, Priya Basil explores with compassion, the universal complexities of vanity and love. Her sensuous portrayal of the trials and tribulations of the Singh family carries universal truths for all of us.

THE ORIENTALIST AND THE GHOST Susan Barker

Susan Barker is twenty-five-years old, with a Chinese-Malay mother and an English father, and grew up in East London. She spent two years working in Japan after her graduation. She has just completed an MA in Creative Writing from Manchester University. Sayonara Bar was her first novel.

Her second novel, The Orientalist and the Ghost opens in Malaysia during the 1950s Communist insurrection when a young Englishman, Christopher, falls in love with a Chinese girl. The book then moves to 1969 where Frances, Christopher's Eurasian teenage daughter, is seduced by a Chinese teacher twice her age and drawn into the Malay-Chinese race riots in Kuala Lumpur. The final part of the book travels to 1980s London: Frances' two mixed-race children live with their grandfather on a council estate, and embark on a quest to discover the truth behind their mother's death. Dark themes of colonial misconduct, racial prejudice, and doomed love resonate throughout this novel, yet it is infused with characteristic humour and warmth.

TROUBLE CAME TO THE TURNIP- Caroline Bird

Caroline Bird was born in 1986. She grew up in Leeds and attended the Steiner School in York before moving to London in 2001. She won the Poetry Society's Simon Elvin Young Poet of the Year Award two years running (1999 and 2000) and won an Eric Gregory Award in 2002. Her poems have appeared in PN Review, Poetry Review, The North magazine and in Carcanet's New Poetries III anthology (2002). Her first collection, Looking Through Letterboxes, built on the traditions of fairy tale, fantasy and romance, was published in 2002. Her second collection, Trouble Came to the Turnip, was published in September 2006. She is currently studying English at Oxford University.

In Trouble Came to the Turnip, Bird’s poems are ferociously vital, fantastical, sometimes violent, almost always savagely humorous and self-mocking. Her world is inhabited by failed and (less often) successful relationships, by the dizzying crisis of early adulthood, by leprechauns and spells and Miss Pringle's seven lovely daughters waiting to spring out of a cardboard cake. And the turnip.

THE SECRET - Zoe Brigley

Zoe Brigley was born in Caerphilly in the Rhymney Valley in 1981. In 2003 she won an Eric Gregory Award and later received an Academi bursary in 2005. She studied English Literature and Creative Writing at the University of Warwick, later obtaining an MA on Gender and Literature, and is currently a postgraduate fellow at Warwick. Zoe has found time to work and travel in Central America, particularly Mexico. The Secret is her first book of poems, and a Poetry Book Society Recommendation.

The Secret is a poetry book of mystery and magic. Opening on familiar ground – retelling stories from the Bible, Celtic mythology, small-town rumours and urban mythologies – it gradually moves beyond its borders to narratives of Central America, drawing on figures such as the Spanish conquistador, Hernan Cortes, and the Mexican artist, Frida Kahlo. Using a large variety of poetic forms, her writing oscillates between global languages and minor ways of speaking. The book is split into three sections that spiral further away from ideas of home towards the discovery of gifts in other cultures.

ZOOLOGY - Ben Dolnick

Ben Dolnick was born in 1982 and grew up in Chevy Chase, Maryland. He graduated from Columbia University, where he studied English and writing. He has worked as a zookeeper at the Central Park Zoo, a bookseller, a research assistant in an immunology lab, and a tutor. He currently lives in Brooklyn, New York. Zoology is his first novel.

The book Zoology is the story of Henry Elinsky, a college flunk-out who takes a job at the Central Park Zoo and discovers that becoming an adult takes a lot more than just a weekly paycheck. To many critics this book introduces one of the most memorable, oddly charming, and completely authentic narrators in contemporary fiction. Henry Elinsky in Zoology is authentically adolescent -- likable, funny, irritating, self-doubting and self-obsessed.

BLOOD KIN - Ceridwen Dovey

Ceridwen was born in Pietermaritzburg, South Africa, in 1980. Ceridwen grew up mostly in the small town of East London in the Eastern Cape of South Africa, but she and sister Liniwe went to high school in Sydney. After a year in London working and travelling, she did her undergraduate study at Harvard on scholarship, focusing on Social Anthropology and Visual & Environmental Studies (Film). Ceridwen moved to Cape Town for two years, where she wrote Blood Kin as her thesis for the Masters in Creative Writing at the University of Cape Town, with poet Stephen Watson as her supervisor. She now lives in New York City.

Blood Kin is a story of a president overthrown by a military coup in a nameless country, and in the midst of mass arrests, three members of the Presidential household – his barber, chef and portraitist – are taken hostage in a remote mountain palace. As the order falls, the truth about these men and significant lives is revealed, and the web of complicity and duplicity begins to unravel. Dovey’s mesmerizing debut grapples with humanity’s most mercenary and animalistic instincts, and reminds the reader that the mad king is within us all.

SUBMARINE - Joe Dunthorne

Joe Dunthorne was born and brought up in Swansea, South Wales. He is a graduate of the Creative Writing Masters at UEA, where he was awarded the Curtis Brown Prize. His poetry has been published in Reactions 5, Magma, Smiths Knoll and Tears in the Fence. His work has been featured on Channel 4, BBC Radio 3, 4 and in The Guardian and Vice magazine. His debut novel, Submarine, was translated in to six languages and was published in February 2007.

Submarine is about the dryly precocious, soon-to-be-fifteen-year-old hero, Oliver Tate, who lives in the seaside town of Swansea, Wales. At once a self-styled social scientist, a spy in the baffling adult world surrounding him, and a budding, hormone-driven emotional explorer, Oliver is stealthily nosing his way forward through the murky and uniquely perilous waters of adolescence. Uncovering the secrets behind his parents’ teetering marriage, unraveling the mystery that is his alluring and equally quirky classmate Jordana Bevan, and understanding where he fits in among the pansexuals, Zoroastrians, and other mystifying, fascinating beings in his orbit.

OYSTERCATCHERS - Susan Fletcher

Susan Fletcher was born in Birmingham in 1979. She studied Creative Writing at the University of East Anglia, and lives in Stratford-upon-Avon. Her first novel, Eve Green (2004), tells the story of eight-year-old Evie, who is sent to a new life in rural Wales, where she discovers a family secret. Eve Green won the 2004 Whitbread First Novel Award and the 2005 Betty Trask Prize. Her second novel, Oystercatchers, was published in 2007.

Oystercatchers is a novel about trust, loss and loneliness. In the book, the main character Moira visits her younger sister Amy in hospital who lies in a coma. It is here, Moira confesses. She admits to her childhood selfishness, which deeply hurt her family. And it is as Amy lies half-dying that she sees the real truth: she's been a cruel sister. Waterstones have described it as a mysterious, elemental and, at times, beautifully poetic novel.

SATSUMA SUN MOVER - Adam Green

Adam Green was born in Radlett, England in 1982. His stories, music writings, interviews and directionless musings – on existentialism, gnat seduction rituals and Dave Brubeck – have appeared in Void Magazine, The Erotic Review, Blues and Soul, All About Jazz, History of Human Sciences and Global Media and Communication. He also wrote for and co-produced the UK’s first weekly Jazz News TV programme, which broadcast on Sky from March 2007. He composed Satsuma Sun Mover after pondering why nobody had yet come up with a satisfactory comic rendering of the philosophies of Gottfried Hegel.

Adam Green's first novel Satsuma Sun Mover charts the oft-explored depths of a young man's soul with great wit and imagination. Fresh-faced, underweight and overdressed, Theo Fintwistle embarks on a surreal journey to free mankind from the tyranny of the post-modern condition equipped only with a bizarre shopping list and youthful idealism. Rattling round the universe like a Murray mint in God's pocket lining, Theo encounters a range of weird and wonderful characters who help him in his quest to free a humanity clutching onto unhappiness with fag-stained fingertips.

BLACKMOOR - Edward Hogan

Edward Hogan was born in Derby, in 1980. He was working in Nottingham's Council House when he was writing his first novel. After leaving school Edward enrolled on the University of East Anglia's MA in Creative Writing course, winning the David Higham Award. After graduating he was signed up with publisher Simon & Schuster. Since the launch of Blackmoor Edward's been named as 'a writer to watch' by Peter Carty in The Independent whilst authors Miriam Toews and Hilary Mantel are also fans.

The book Blackmoor centres around a small mining community and Edward says he chose this setting because he wanted to find out more about the place he grew up. It's a regional book, about the midlands and the north and what has happened to the mining communities since people have stopped mining. His split time-frame is combined with multiple narrative perspectives, which enable him to dig deep into his characters. He is aided by writing that is charged with a bite and passion harking back to his Northern forebears; D.H. Lawrence, most obviously, with a passing touch of Charlotte Brontë.

SONS & OTHER FLAMMABLE OBJECTS - Porohistra Khakpour

Porochista Khakpour was born in Tehran, Iran in 1978 - raised in Los Angeles, and now lives in New York. She received her BA from Sarah Lawrence College and her MA from Johns Hopkins University. Her writing has appeared or is forthcoming in The New York Times, The Village Voice, The Chicago Reader, Paper, Flaunt, Nylon, Bidoun and FiveChapters.com, among many others. She has been awarded fellowships from The Johns Hopkins University Writing Seminars, Northwestern University, and The Sewanee Writers' Conference. She currently teaches Fiction at Bucknell University.

Her first novel, Sons and Other Flammable Objects was published in September 2007 to great critical acclaim. The lyrical dark comedy, centered on the aftermath of 9/11 and Iranian fathers and sons in Los Angeles and New York, was a New York Times Editor's Choice and was included on the Chicago Tribune's 2007 Fall's Best list. It won the 77th annual California Book Award prize in First Fiction. Her writing has been compared to that of Zadie Smith and Philip Roth.

THE BOAT - Nam Le

Nam Le was born in Vietnam and raised in Australia. He has received the Pushcart Prize, the Michener-Copernicus Society of America Award, and fellowships from the Iowa Writers' Workshop, the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown, and Phillips Exeter Academy. His fiction has appeared in venues including Zoetrope: All-Story, A Public Space, Conjunctions, One Story, NPR's, Selected Shorts and the Best American Nonrequired Reading, Best New American Voices, Best Australian Stories, and Pushcart Prize anthologies. He is the fiction editor of the Harvard Review.

The Boat is a stunningly inventive, deeply moving fiction debut: stories that take the readers from the slums of Colombia to the streets of Tehran; from New York City to Iowa City; from a tiny fishing village in Australia to a foundering vessel in the South China Sea, in a masterful display of literary virtuosity and feeling. In the opening story, "Love and Honor and Pity and Pride and Compassion and Sacrifice," a young writer is urged by his friends to mine his father's experiences in Vietnam — and what seems at first a satire on turning one's life into literary commerce becomes a transcendent exploration of homeland, and the ties between father and son.

CHILDREN OF THE REVOLUTION - Dinaw Mengestu

Dinaw Mengestu was born in Ethiopia in 1978 and is a graduate of Georgetwon and Columbia Universities. He works as a journalist and reviewer and is researching a book tracing his extended family’s exile from Ethiopia following the 1974 revolution. Children of the Revolution won the Guardian First Book Award in 2007.

Children of the revolution is a book about one man’s longing for the American dream, and of the tenacious grip of the past across continents and time. It is a tale of an Ethiopian immigrant’s search for acceptance, peace and identity. With effortless prose, Mengestu makes the reader feel this tortured soul’s longings, regrets, and in the end, his dreams of meaningful human connection.

THERE IS AN ANGER THAT MOVES - Kei Miller

Kei Miller was born in Jamaica in 1978. He read English at the University of the West Indies and completed an MA in Creative Writing at Manchester Metropolitan University. Kei’s first collection of short fiction, The Fear of Stones, was short-listed in 2007 for the Commonwealth Writers First Book Prize. His first poetry collection, Kingdom of Empty Bellies, was published in March 2006; and his second, There Is an Anger That Moves, was published in October 2007. He currently teaches Creative Writing at the University of Glasgow.

The six sequences of There Is an Anger that Moves travel from Jamaica to England and back. A mother's heart is broken; men fall in love secretly; people dance until they die. Religion haunts these disbelieving poems, which move sometimes to the measure of a hymn, sometimes to the cadence of a Baptist sermon. Each swells with its own conviction, even when that conviction is doubt. Miller makes the reader believe in the power of unexpected things: the colour orange, broken coffins, ice cream and in the transforming power of poetry.

GOD’S OWN COUNTRY - Ross Raisin

Ross Raisin was born in Yorkshire and now lives in London. He is twenty-seven years old. Before university he spent time working in the hotel trade, working in hotels in France and Ireland. When he graduated, he began working in a wine bar in London, eventually becoming co-manager. Ross has continued to work as a waiter while writing the novel, and still does so now as he begins his second, a novel about a Glaswegian ex-shipyard worker, whose life unravels after the death of his wife.

God’s Own Country is told through the eyes of the narrator, Sam Marsdyke - the teenage son of a farmer up on the Yorkshire Moors, who spends his days working the sheep, mending fences and trying to dodge the eye of his brutal, silent father, around him. One day a young daughter of a new family catches his eye. As he falls for the young, sophisticated girl from London, she begins to see him as a means to escape but this journey across the moors takes a terrifying menacing turn which, for Sam, will prove his terrible undoing.

ST LUCY’S HOME FOR GIRLS RAISED BY WOLVES - Karen Russell

Karen Russell was born in Miami, Florida in 1981. She has featured in both The New Yorker's debut fiction issue and New York magazine's list of twenty-five people to watch under the age of twenty-six. She is a graduate of the Columbia MFA program and is the 2005 recipient of the Transatlantic Review/Henfield Foundation Award; her fiction has recently appeared in Conjunctions, Granta, Zoetrope, Oxford American, and The New Yorker. She now lives in New York City.

The 10 stories of Russell's debut, St Lucy’s Home for Girls Raised By Wolves, are set in an enchanted version of North America and narrated by articulate, emotionally precocious children from dysfunctional households. In the collection’s title story, a pack of girls raised by wolves are painstakingly reeducated by nuns. Russell’s stories are beautifully written and exuberantly imagined and it is the emotional precision behind their wondrous surfaces that makes them unforgettable.

.

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